Tag Archive | "Doug Fister"

Dear Yankee Fans … I might have spoken too soon.

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Dear Yankee Fans … I might have spoken too soon.

Posted on 16 October 2012 by Trish Vignola

Remember, when I said “Dear Yankee Fans…. Chill Out”? Maybe, I spoke too quickly.

The 12th inning cast a very different pallor on a relatively young ALCS last night. As the Yankees’ future Hall of Fame shortstop, Derek Jeter, was helped off the field, even the Tigers dugout was hushed.

Most of those players had grown up watching Jeter and the New York Yankees.

“We’re all big Derek Jeter fans since we were younger,” outfielder Delmon Young said. “Watching the World Series and everything from the 1996 one until the recent once. But, you know, we all grew up playing backyard baseball wanting to win the World Series either with the Yankees or having to get through the Yankees to get to the World Series. Especially with Derek Jeter as their catalyst.

“We’d love to see him out playing with us and playing against him, because it is really fun playing the Yankees, especially with Derek Jeter healthy,” Young continued. Doug Fister, last night’s start for Detroit, talked about watching Jeter as he grew up. “To see a fellow ballplayer to go down it definitely is a hit for our game,” Fister said. “Our hearts go out to him.”

Ok. This is not a career ending injury. However, Jeter is out for the rest of the 2012 playoffs. This will be the first October the Yankees have experienced in sixteen years that will be without Derek Jeter.

Grant it. When Mariano Rivera got hurt, the Yankees were left for dead. Jeter’s injury doesn’t preclude an early Yankees exit from the playoffs. The Yankees have come back from far worse.

Except…

Derek Jeter was, at the time of his injury, the strongest Yankee this playoff.

Written off as an aging star after slumping in 2010, Jeter struggled to adapt to a no-stride swing in `11. He wound up on the disabled list for only the fifth time in his seventeen full seasons in the big leagues with a calf injury. He returned revitalized, go his 3,000th hit and finishing strong.

This year Jeter surged. It’s hard to believe, but 38-year-old Jeter posted a remarkable season. He batted .316 with an American League-leading 216 hits. He carried that over to the postseason, hitting .364 against the Orioles.

Earlier Saturday, Jeter became the first player in baseball history to reach 200 hits in the postseason with a single in the second off Doug Fister. He was left stranded, though, a problem for the Yankees these playoffs. If the New York Yankees were a train, they would be pulling into the station missing a couple of wheels and part of the breaks. Sure, they’re showing up on time (i.e. winning), but how long can this keep going? Robinson Cano, Curtis Granderson and Nick Swisher are in playoff funks. Alex Rodriguez, one of the greatest players in baseball history, is in worse shape. He’s been benched now on more than one occasion in this young playoff season. The Yankees also seem to have a problem lacing more than one win together. Jeter was one of the few constants, along with statistical anomaly and late-game guru, Raul Ibanez, in the Yankees’ lineup.

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AL Pitching Planner: May 28 – June 3

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AL Pitching Planner: May 28 – June 3

Posted on 29 May 2012 by Mark Sherrard

This week’s AL two-starters features the reigning Cy Young/MVP as well as Detroit’s other ace.

Here are the AL two-start pitchers and other favorable matchups for Week 9:

Two-Start Pitchers

No-Brainers

Justin Verlander: 5/29 @ BOS; 6/3 vs NYY – Verlander is a must-start in all leagues, even when facing these guys

Jered Weaver: 5/28 vs NYY; 6/3 vs TEX – had one bad start after his no-hitter and that was against Texas

Doug Fister: 5/28 @ BOS; 6/2 vs NYY – still looking for his first win despite a 1.84 ERA

Results

Week 6 – 6 GS, 4 QS, 2 W, 38.2 IP, 54 H+BB, 36 K’s, 17 ER, 3.96 ERA, 1.40 whip

YTD – 43 GS, 31 QS, 24 W, 289.0 IP, 349 H+BB, 243 K’s, 101 ER, 3.15 ERA, 1.21 whip

Not Too Shabby

Matt Moore: 5/28 vs CHW; 6/3 vs BAL – hasn’t lived up to the hype, but has only given up more than 3 ER twice

Phil Hughes: 5/28 vs LAA; 6/3 @ DET – seems to have turned things around in May (3.45 ERA)

Matt Harrison: 5/28 vs SEA; 6/3 @ LAA – pitched well last time out versus Mariners

Chris Sale: 5/28 @ TB; 6/3 vs SEA – on a roll (1.85 ERA in May) and gets to face the Mariners

Daniel Bard: 5/29 vs DET; 6/3 @ TOR – walks are hurting him lately (5.96 BB/9 in May), so be careful

Felix Doubront: 5/28 vs DET; 6/2 @ TOR – has been pretty consistent so far (4.09 ERA in April, 3.86 in May)

Jake Arrieta: 5/28 @ TOR; 6/3 @ TB – has an excellent 3.31 K/BB ratio, needs to cut down on HR’s allowed

Kevin Millwood: 5/28 @ TEX; 6/3 @ CHW – 3 straight quality starts for the 37 year old

Scott Diamond: 5/28 vs OAK; 6/3 @ CLE – has been a pleasant surprise so far, with a 17/3 K/BB ratio

Results

Week 6 – 36 GS, 18 QS, 15 W, 219.1 IP, 284 H+BB, 169 K’s, 91 ER, 3.73 ERA, 1.29 whip

YTD – 115 GS, 65 QS, 48 W, 708.1 IP, 924 H+BB, 522 K’s, 310 ER, 3.94 ERA, 1.30 whip

Risky at Best

Drew Hutchison: 5/28 vs BAL; 6/3 vs BOS – got knocked around last time out and faces two good hitting teams

Nathan Adcock: 5/28 @ CLE; 6/3 vs OAK – minor league numbers don’t foretell sucess

Josh Tomlin: 5/28 vs KC; 6/3 vs MIN – coming off wrist injury, needs to prove he’s healthy

Graham Godfrey: 5/28 @ MIN; 6/3 @ KC – there haven’t been very many positives so far in his major league career

Results

Week 6 – 5 GS, 3 QS, 1 W, 28.2 IP, 40 H+BB, 20 K’s, 16 ER, 5.02 ERA, 1.40 whip

YTD – 61 GS, 24 QS, 16 W, 329.0 IP, 499 H+BB, 228 K’s, 199 ER, 5.44 ERA, 1.52 whip

Other Favorable Matchups

As with the NL, I am going to be focusing on AL pitchers owned less than 50% in CBS leagues with favorable matchup for the week (for those of you who utilize “streaming”).

Jeanmar Gomez (14% owned): 5/30 vs KC

He’s 2-2 with a 3.81 ERA against the Royals in his career and 1-1 with a 2.84 ERA in his last 3.

Blake Beavan (7% owned): 5/30 @ TEX

Beavan has a career 1.71 ERA against his home state team

Henderson Alvarez (49% owned): 6/1 vs BOS

Just under the threshold at 49%, Alvarez has given up only 1 ER in 12 IP against the Red Sox

P.J. Walters (10% owned): 6/1 @ CLE

Has never faced the Indians, which may work to his advantage.  Is a surprising 2-1 with a 2.95 ERA on the season.

Tommy Milone (49% owned): 6/1 @ KC

Milone shut the Royals out over 8 IP the last time he faced them and is 2-1 with a 2.57 ERA on the season.

Results

Week 6 – 2 GS, 0 QS, 0 W, 8.2 IP, 17 H+BB, 9 K’s, 6 ER, 6.23 ERA, 1.96 whip

YTD – 19 GS, 10 QS, 6 W, 125.2 IP, 158 H+BB, 111 K’s, 48 ER, 3.44 ERA, 1.26 whip

See ya next week.

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The Waiver Wire: Drew Smyly

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The Waiver Wire: Drew Smyly

Posted on 12 April 2012 by Jared Thatcher

Were you one of the managers that had Doug Fister or some other struggling starting pitcher on their roster this week? Well, lucky for you, I have an idea. If you over-manage like I do, then you are probably looking to make some changes in your starting pitcher lineup after only a few games.

My suggestion to you is to add Detroit Tigers starting pitcher Drew Smyly immediately. I took a little heat when I ranked Smyly higher than almost everyone else on my Top 100 Prospects list, but I have faith he can make it in the bigs. I have so much faith in him in fact, that I also projected him as the AL Rookie of the Year for 2012.

Smyly is owned in 0.5% of ESPN fantasy leagues. That number could increase dramatically after tomorrows start if he performs even close to what how I think he will. If your league gives points for Wins then Smyly is an easy pickup due to the fact that he might have the best offense in years behind him. The Tigers should be able to give him a comfortable lead early, which will allow him to pitch without any restrictions or worries.

Smyly might walk a few batters but he definitely has the stuff to strike out a few batters as well. At Double-A last year, he averaged 10.4 strikeouts per nine innings and registered a sterling 1.18 ERA. He has excellent control and even better command of his pitches. The Tigers have never been afraid of throwing young pitchers out there so I don’t expect his rotation spot to be in jeopardy very quickly.

Pick up Smyly as a spot starter this week and be prepared to make him a stable part of your rotation going forward.

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The Roster Report – February 1, 2012

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The Roster Report – February 1, 2012

Posted on 01 February 2012 by Bryan Grosnick

Hey there, hardball fans! Welcome to the first edition of  The Roster Report here at Full Spectrum Baseball. I’ll be breaking down transactions big and small here at FSB on a twice-weekly basis. Basically, I’m here to get you caught up on the major and minor moves that shape your favorite MLB squads, and give you the best analysis as to how that will affect their on-field success in the future. And if there’s a chance that a move will affect your fantasy baseball team, well, I’ll cover that too! Lastly, if you have any questions or comments, please reach out in the comments section or via Twitter (@bgrosnick), and I’ll do my best to keep up.

This week’s article features acquisitions from the Detroit Tigers, Philadelphia Phillies, San Francisco Giants, Cleveland Indians, and New York Mets. Let’s get to it!

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The Detroit Tigers sign 1B Prince Fielder to a nine-year, $214MM contract.
Yeah, you’ve probably already heard about this one. Let’s not talk about Prince, who is already entrenched as the new Tiger 1B, and should continue to be a productive power hitter for at least a few more years. Instead, let’s talk about the rest of the Detroit Tigers, and how this team will be affected by his arrival. First, and most importantly, incumbent first-sacker and perennial MVP candidate Miguel Cabrera is off to third base. While Cabrera’s bat is potent, his glove is not. Cabrera was a poor-fielding third baseman in 2006 and 2007, and he was an average-to-poor fielding first baseman over the past four years, whether you look at advanced metrics like UZR, or just the eye test. With an infield of Cabrera, Jhonny Peralta, Ryan Raburn, and Prince Fielder, Detroit could offer one of the worst defensive squads in major-league history. They’re basically the opposite of the Ventura-Ordonez-Alfonzo-Olerud “Greatest Infield Ever” that the New York Mets had in the early 2000s. Even worse, Delmon Young, the prohibitive Opening Day left-fielder, is equally awful in the field. The Tigers are going all-in on hitting, and their run prevention will suffer as a result. I would not want to be a ground ball pitcher like Rick Porcello in 2012.

Fielder’s addition and Cabrera’s move definitely changes the makeup of the Detroit bench. With only four bench spots available on most AL squads, versatility will be especially key for the Tigers and manager Jim Leyland. A backup catcher (Gerald Laird) is a necessity, and Ramon Santiago will likely platoon with Ryan Raburn at 2B and back up Jhonny Peralta at short. The last two slots should be going towards a backup outfielder (likely Andy Dirks, who can play all three OF positions), and perhaps long-time Tiger Brandon Inge. Leyland sees Inge as a super-sub who can cycle in not just at his natural 3B, but also at catcher, outfield,  and (according to Leyland) 2B and SS. Inge has never played in the middle of the infield before, but if he can, he would be one of the most versatile players in the majors this year. That’s great and everything, but he still can’t hit a lick. Fortunately, offense should be in heavy supply in the Motor City this season. Don Kelly, who may start the season as the DH, can also back up at the corners.

The Tigers’ addition of another massive bat to the lineup certainly shook up the AL Central, but it shouldn’t shake up the fantasy order of things too much. Miguel Cabrera’s move to third, a woefully weak position in 2012, makes him an easy top-5 pick in any mixed fantasy draft. I’d even look at him as the No. 1 overall choice in many leagues. Prince Fielder may see a drop in HR due to Comerica Park’s debilitating effect on left-handed power, but his overall stats will still keep him as a high-ranking 1B option.  The rest of Detroit’s offensive starters will see a small boost due to the addition of another great hitter, and all of Detroit’s pitchers should lose value due to the newly-porous defense. Doug Fister may have had a brilliant breakout 2011, but his reliance on D will hurt him this season. And I would run away from Rick Porcello, a ground-ball specialist, like he was on fire.

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The Philadelphia Phillies sign LF Juan Pierre to a minor league contract with an invitation to Spring Training.
Dominic Brown, and plenty of Phillies fans, must be shaking their heads at this one. Though Pierre isn’t guaranteed a spot on the major-league roster, he’ll provide increased competition for the void in left field left by the departure of Raul Ibanez. Competition in LF will be tight, as Pierre must fend off new Phillies Ty Wigginton and Laynce Nix as well as holdovers John Mayberry Jr. and Dominic Brown. Wigginton will probably start at 1B with Ryan Howard out to start the season, but when and if Howard returns (or if Jim Thome can handle everyday duties at first), expect the former Rockie to fill in at LF.

Before the signing of Pierre, the best bet for left field was probably a platoon of John Mayberry Jr. and newly-acquired Laynce Nix. A Nix-Mayberry platoon is actually a pretty solid left fielder, as Mayberry can do some real damage against lefties and Nix strikes the ball hard against right-handers. Both players have home run power and positional versatility. But Dominic Brown is still an excellent prospect with a well-rounded skillset. He’s also one of the few Phillies young enough to be a long-term fixture at Citizens Bank Park. With the Phillies looking to make another run at the World Series, manager Charlie Manuel may want Juan Pierre’s “veteran leadership” more than he would want a good ballplayer in LF, and that’s bad news for those of us who think Brown could be a star soon.

From a fantasy standpoint, Pierre gets another stay of execution. If Juan gets the Opening Day start, it will probably be atop the Philadelphia order, and he’ll go back to racking up SB, R, and batting average, owned in all leagues. Steals are valuable, and even as Pierre’s SB totals slide, he still finds value on any fantasy squad that values speed. But make no mistake, Juan Pierre is no longer a starting-caliber outfielder in real-world baseball. Sooner or later, the Phillies are going to have to run a real player out there in left field, whether it is Dom Brown, Laynce Nix, or John Mayberry. If Dominic Brown gets the LF job, then he’s worth a fantasy own, but Nix and Mayberry may not get enough plate appearances to be fantasy factors in anything but NL-only leagues.

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The San Francisco Giants sign RP / SP Clay Hensley to a one-year, $750K contract.
The Giants signed former Marlin Clay Hensley to a non-guaranteed one-year contract. In my opinion, this is a great, low-risk deal for a reliever who’s been effective in the past. In a full year in relief for the Marlins in 2010, Hensley was very solid, posting an unreal 2.16 ERA and 2.87 FIP. But that isn’t what you should expect from him going forward…he’s unlikely to strike out a batter an inning again. Last year, Hensley regressed, though part of the reason his stats (5.19 ERA, 4.90 FIP) were so bad was due to an unimpressive nine-game run as a starter. Left to his devices in the bullpen, and especially benefiting from San Francisco’s wacky park magic (ESPN’s Park Factors have AT&T Park as the most pitcher-friendly park in MLB), Hensley will probably notch solid rate stats and more than a few holds. This is the kind of low-risk deal on a reliever every team should shoot for.

Quick Hits

  • The San Francisco Giants also added Ryan Theriot on a one-year, $1.25MM contract. The Riot is completely replaceable, a very average option at 2B or SS. But we all know how much Brian Sabean likes bringing in veteran retreads, so this feels like a natural fit. If and when Freddy Sanchez gets injured again, he’ll probably take over at 2B. Avoid in fantasy.
  • Dan Wheeler, a journeyman reliever who last pitched for the Red Sox, signed on with the Cleveland Indians. Wheeler made a bad business decision when he turned down arbitration from the Sox, but then had to settle for a minor-league contract. He’s a very solid reliever, and will probably fit nicely in the Cleveland bullpen, as he posted his best FIP and xFIP in three years with Boston last year. Wheeler even has a little closing experience, so he could get the call if Chris Perez implodes during the season.
  • The Indians also acquired Russ Canzler from the Tampa Bay Rays in exchange for cash considerations. Canzler hit quite well at Triple-A Durham for the Rays, won the International League MVP award, and could very well compete with Matt LaPorta for time at 1B this season. Canzler has a .411 wOBA over the past two seasons in Double-A and Triple-A, hits for power, and has remarkable plate discipline. Steve Slowinski at DRaysBay advocated making him a part of the Rays major-league roster earlier this offseason, so this could very well be an under-the-radar move that pays big dividends for Cleveland. If he gets a starting gig, he’ll play in fantasy leagues too.
  • The Phillies made another move as part of their bullpen revamp, adding Chad Qualls on a one-year, $1.15MM contract. It’s a good deal for a reliever because it only lasts one year, and Qualls has had a lot of success in the past. In 2011 with the Padres, Chad saw his K rate fall off by two strikeouts per nine innings, but his walk rate and HR rate fell as well, balancing things out. Qualls probably isn’t an elite reliever, or even as good as Antonio Bastardo, but he’s a solid piece for the rebuilt Philadelphia ‘pen, and he came much cheaper than Jonathan Papelbon did.
  • The Mets added former top prospect Matt Tuiasosopo, previously of the Seattle Mariners. Despite being a toolsy player and a former top prospect, Tui played very poorly in Triple-A last season, and is probably nothing more than an organizational depth guy. Tui’s only impact will be on spell-checkers, as he shouldn’t be a factor in fantasy or for the major-league squad. He’s just a guy.

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